October means planting has just begun for veggies

by Christina Molcillo October 14, 2019

October means planting has just begun for veggies

For many growers, October means the beginning of harvest season and time to get the garden ready for the cold weather. But, for the warmer climate zones, October means it’s time to get planting – for grows both large-scale and small. In these warmer regions, Southern California especially, growers can point to years of warm Halloween celebrations and toasty Santa Ana winds throughout the month, though the mornings can start off chilly.

Morning Garden

While the fall season in these regions is temperate, its far cooler than in the summer months, and far less stressful for new plants. The rainfall will have begun, but it generally arrives in light showers at this time as opposed to the deluge of a winter storm. These gentle rains will keep the new growth watered, and as the sun is lower in the sky, it will evaporate more slowly, lessening the need for constant irrigation.

Veggie garden

Not only can the fall be easier on new plants, but late fall and winter is also the only time some annuals will grow! That means that now is the time to get those seeds started. Here are the top 6 vegetables to plant this fall:

Broccoli

Broccoli: Best planted in fall, this cool-season crop is a good source of Vitamin A, potassium, folic acid, iron, and fiber. Fertilize broccoli three weeks after transplanting seedlings into the garden, and try not to disturb the plants when they start to grow as their roots run shallow.

Carrots

Carrot: These root vegetables are fast-growing and can be planted twice a year! Plan for at least 12 inches to allow the seeds to grow and dig out any rocks or other obstructions in the soil – this can cause twisted or misshapen roots; they’ll still taste good, but won’t be so pretty!

Cabbage

Cabbage: This is a prime cool-season crop, growing best when daytime temperatures are around 55 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Water regularly, keeping the soil moist as they grow. Cabbage can take anywhere from 70 – 120 days to mature; they are ready to harvest when the head is firm and the leaves aren’t loose. If freezing temperatures happen early in the season, it’s best to harvest it early as they don’t do well in extreme cold.

Lettuce

Lettuce: Another cool-weather crop that does best in fall, lettuce seedlings can even withstand a light frost! Make sure the soil is loose and drains well, and should be amended with compost or other nutrients before planting. Lettuce seeds germinate best at 55 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit, emerging around 7 to 10 days after planting. Harvest lettuce when it reaches full size, but just before maturity as the leaves will taste best when they’re still tender.

Radishes

Radish: An easy to grow root, radishes can be planted multiple times during a season, and do best in loose, well-fertilized soil. Radishes are ready to harvest fairly quickly after planting, as soon as three weeks after sowing depending on the variety. They should be harvested when they’re about 1” in diameter at the surface of the soil – be careful not to wait too long after maturity, as their condition will deteriorate quickly if left in the ground.

Snow Peas

Snow peas: The cooler fall temperatures encourage pea plants to grow faster than seeds planted in the spring, and they’ll do best if the soil is loosened and treated with compost or fertilizer. Snow peas need the soil to stay moist, so keep track of how often they’re being watered. Harvest snow peas when the pods are a few inches long with peas that aren't fully developed.

Geoflora Nutrient

A recurring theme for these cool-weather greens is fertilize, fertilize, fertilize. Though it’s not a spring planting, these veggies will flourish with the 19 organic inputs and beneficial microbes found in Geoflora VEG and BLOOM. Geoflora Nutrients is an easy to use organic fertilizer system that can be deployed on a large scale, or in a personal grow. The added biological charge in Geoflora Nutrients aids in taking each input to its full potential, creating a web of living soil biology designed to aid in the transport and availability of key macro and secondary nutrients. It may be getting cooler outside, but with Geoflora Nutrients giving your vegetables a boost, you’re good to grow!

Geoflor Product

Have a hydroponic or garden supply store? Left Coast Wholesale has you covered with wholesale pricing available on Geoflora Nutrients. If you’re looking for Geoflora Nutrients near you, call 800.681.1757 today to find a local Geoflora Nutrients retailer!




Christina Molcillo
Christina Molcillo

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