Rhizobacteria sounds gross, but it’s not. Here’s why

by Christina Molcillo September 03, 2019

Rhizobacteria sounds gross, but it’s not. Here’s why

After a couple of seasons, gardeners are no longer a novice to the art of growing and often look beyond the basic such as fertilizer. This is because they understand that there’s more that can be done for the plants than just supplying water and clearing out weeds that can help improve yields and keep the plants in good health.

Plant roots

The root system is a good place to start when looking for what can be done to provide any additional nutrients or ensure water is readily available for uptake. Roots are where a plant's vascular system begins, with water and nutrients are pulled up from the oxygenated soil around the roots, which is known as the root zone. This zone is vital to the plant, and everything the plant takes from this root zone is dispersed through the rest of it. If the roots are getting the nutrients, the leaves will, too.

Root zone

Which brings us to rhizobacteria. Rhizobacteria are a root-associated bacteria that form symbiotic relationships with many plants, and this symbiosis is beneficial for both the plant as well as the bacteria. One of the most helpful outcomes of this relationship for the plants is nitrogen fixation, where Rhizobacteria convert gaseous nitrogen to ammonia, making it an available nutrient to the plant, which can use it to support and enhance its growth. The plant provides the rhizobacteria with amino acids, so it does not need to assimilate the ammonia.

Rhizobacteria

This is just one of the many ways the rhizobacteria work in  the root zone to the benefit of the plant, and it’s such an important role that within the root zone is an area known as the rhizosphere; a region in the soil that is directly influenced by root secretions. This rhizosphere contains a collection of bacteria and other microorganism that feed off sloughed off plant cells, along with the proteins and sugars secreted by the roots, in return giving the plant the ability to uptake phosphorus, nitrogen, potassium and water more easily.

Bacteria under a microscope 

There are ways a grower can focus on the root zone to give their plants a boost of rhizobacteria! Tribus Original is a highly concentrated, targeted blend of three growth-promoting rhizobacteria that can be used with organic or conventional growing practices to increase crop quality and quantity. The bacteria in Tribus Original will populate the root zone of plants in all mediums and does not cause problematic biofilm formation in hydroponic applications. Tribus Original can be used on seedlings as well, to reduce the time from cut to root in clones while simultaneously encouraging vigorous development of new roots.

Tribus original

If you’re looking for something beyond water and fertilizer, Tribus Originalcould be the bacterial support your plants need to grow stronger!

Have a hydroponic or garden supply store? Left Coast Wholesale has you covered with wholesale pricing available on Tribus Original™. If you’re looking for Tribus Original™ near you, call 800.681.1757 today to find a local Tribus Original™ retailer!




Christina Molcillo
Christina Molcillo

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